Monday, July 22, 2013

Patterns Patterns Everywhere

"Life forms illogical patterns. It is haphazard and full of beauties which I try to catch as they fly by, for who knows whether any of them will ever return?" Margot Fonteyn

Since beginning my journey with Zentangle I have become very aware of patterns in the world around me. I notice the patterns in fabric and linens, in architecture and nature, in rugs and clothes. In EVERYTHING! Why do you think I chose this background for my blog? I have even programmed my husband to notice patterns. So between the two of us we have taken many photos on our phones of patterns we see while out and about. The idea is that I will study these patterns and be inspired to create the steps for drawing them.

In reality, I often forget about the pictures we've taken. And when I do remember them...well, I'm impatient. So when I sit down to work on the steps, if those steps don't come quickly I give up easily. I figure that I'm wasting valuable time when I could be tangling instead. But a few days ago I was inspired by a picture in, of all places, a coloring book. The pattern was very simple, so I was able create it before I got impatient and gave up. As a matter of fact, the basic pattern is so simple that I can't believe it hasn't already been published as a Zentangle pattern. If anyone has seen this somewhere else, please let me know.

Here are the steps for the pattern, which I am calling Navaho because it reminds me of a Navajo woven blanket. Spelling it with an "h" is an alternate, rarely used spelling for the Native American tribe. I have also included several variations on the basic pattern. 


For the basic pattern, I drew a diagonal line in each box, and then added 2 lines on each side of that diagonal. Do the same thing in reverse, and there you have the pattern with a checkerboard in the center. Variation 1 has the little squares that were formed by the diagonals blackened in, but before doing that I added another line on each side of both diagonals so the resulting squares would be slightly smaller. 

For variation 2, I drew the first set of diagonals in alternating directions from square to square. Then the diagonals crossing those went under, in hollibaugh fashion.

For  variation 3, I drew the first set of diagonals all going in the same direction and the second set of diagonals went under again. 

3a is the same as 3, but I blackened in a line, following it up and down across the rows. This took a lot of concentration to make sure I was following the line the way I wanted to.  

I am including two Zentangles that I created using Navaho. In this first one I used variation 3a on the bottom right side, and another variation of the basic pattern with parts of the little squares blackened.


In this next Zentangle I used variation 2. I outlined the little squares that were formed using the Sakura black glaze pen which leaves a raised shiny line, but it's hard to see that in the picture. The black glaze pen is my newly discovered treasure and lots of fun to use for accents. If you haven't tried it yet, you really should. 


I'm not sure that either of these zentangles are my favorites, but I did get a lot of practice with my new pattern. I hope you enjoy putting Navaho to the test, and I'd love to see what you do with it. 


24 comments:

  1. pretty awesome pattern! i can see so many variations - nice!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Alice. There are so many variations. I thought of showing a couple more, but figured I'd leave that up to all of you.

      Delete
  2. Caren, I love this new tangle! So simple in strokes, yet so full of possibilities. Thank you for "stepping it out" and exploring some of the variations for us. I love your entire post...I so relate to that! (Except that I have not yet succeeded in "programming" my husband to be a pattern hunter.)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Amy. It is so simple in strokes, which is why I felt sure that someone must have come up with this already, but I searched and didn't see anything really close to it.

      Delete
  3. Nice, it'll be fun to play with! both of your tiles are beautiful!

    ReplyDelete
  4. Caren, this is a great new tangle. I personally was drawn to 3a but I am going to play with them all. Thank you very much or sharing!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Debra. I also think 3a is my favorite.

      Delete
  5. I can't wait to play with this beautiful new tangle. It looks like fun. I also hadn't even thought of using my black glaze pen to accent - what a grand idea!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Cathy. I can almost guarantee that you'll like the black glaze pen. It even works on black tiles to give an elegant look, which I would not have believed.

      Delete
  6. Oh, cool! And don't think I won't be playing with this one. Why it really "calls" to me to put Knightsbridge in that criss-crossed center. I love that 2nd tile...really elegant. I immediately wanted to embroider that on a tablerunner. Yes, I AM IN LOVE with that black glaze pen. Thanks for introducing it in last Saturday's class. :J

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'll look forward to seeing what you do with the pattern.

      Delete
  7. Hi! How surprising that such a simple arrangement of strokes can inspire so much variety! I love this. Tracy

    ReplyDelete
  8. Very nice. I'll try it out soon. (I'm going on holiday!)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Great pattern - Are there any more Native American Zentangles as I am doing a cigar box with N. American art. Thanks. Great job.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks. The best way for you to find what you're looking for would be to go through the pages at tanglepatterns.com

      Delete
  10. This is really neat looking and yet easy to do. Great!

    ReplyDelete
  11. Love this pattern, can't wait to try it out. Thank you for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
  12. Really nice and simple with lots of variations which is what I like to see.
    I also think it would be an easy one for newbies to start with for practice in "straight lines" and in making "auras" ...especially in smaller areas for a learning level.
    Thanks for the nice step out instructions and ideas. I am interested in the "glaze pen" that Linda Farmer mentions that you use. Could you send me some information on it and how you use it. ginny.stiles@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  13. Love this one, and all the variations! Thank you!

    ReplyDelete
  14. Love the purity of line & cool variations.

    ReplyDelete
  15. I’m in my bed, you’re in yours. One of us is obviously in the wrong place. Hey, i am looking for an online sexual partner ;) Click on my boobs if you are interested (. )( .)

    ReplyDelete